Homemade Peanut Butter

I got this amazing and super easy recipe from http://www.loveveggiesandyoga.com/2012/07/homemade-peanut-butter.html  Its the only way we eat peanut butter now and its WAY cheaper than buying organic from the store!  Enjoy 🙂

Once you make peanut butter at home, it will be very difficult to get excited about store bought peanut butter ever again.

Not that eating peanut butter of any kind would ever be a chore because I love it so, but homemade peanut butter is a delicacy. And a nearly effortless delicacy at that.

It’s akin to savoring a piece of high-end dark chocolate that’s rich and pure, uncomplicated by fillers, additives, or ingredients that have no place being in chocolate; and then grabbing a milk chocolate bar in the checkout line at the grocery store, which is likely a combination of tasteless, grainy, and waxy.

Apples and oranges. Store-bought peanut butter versus homemade.

At room temperature, it’s similar in consistency to a stir-free natural peanut butter, thicker than almond butter, but thinner than conventional Jif or Skippy.

I store my homemade peanut butter in an airtight container in the refrigerator and although I could keep it at room temperature, I’m sure it will keep longer being refrigerated and I prefer my peanut butter on the thicker side. Storing it in the fridge helps it to stay thicker and less runny, especially since my house is warmer now during the summer.

Interestingly, my peanut butter has turned out to be “stir-free”.

It has not separated into oil and a solid mass, which is something I detest about natural peanut butters; the oil slick on top and that stubborn dry blob on the bottom that never really wants to re-accept the oil.

Find a food processor and a spoon.

This is crazy good.

The whole process takes less than 5 minutes.

Here’s a step-by-step breakdown (a literal breakdown)

16 ounce bag or jar of peanuts (use honey roasted, plain, salted, unsalted, or try a jar of mixed nuts)

Add peanuts to the canister of the food processor

No oil, no salt, just peanuts

Turn it on and watch it go

Wheeee!

There peanuts go through various stages in the approximately five minutes it takes to go from peanuts to peanut butter:

crushed peanuts

crushed into a fine powder

a paste

a thicker paste

and a big peanut butter “dough ball” will form

And then the big ball will magically break down

And turn into a gritty peanut butter

Keep processing and the peanut butter will get smoother, creamier, and thin out

No oil was ever added at any point during processing – just the natural oils from the peanuts are being released

Keep processing until you’re certain the peanut butter is smooth enough for your liking, another minute or so

I like my peanut butter very smooth, like buttah

The peanut butter is a little on the thinner and runnier side immediately post-processing because it’s warmed from the motor – similar in thickness to store-bought almond butter

After refrigeration, it thickens up a bit

As suggested in the recipe section, flavor your peanut butter with anything you want from vanilla or coffee extract

To cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice or cocoa powder

To spicy or savory, which is great for 2-minute peanut sauce (vegan, GF)

Or add some adult-version flavorings

This is your peanut butter. Get creative.

Homemade Honey Roasted Peanut Butter (gluten-free, use roasted peanuts to keep vegan)

Makes about 1 1/2 cups creamy peanut butter

16 ounces honey roasted peanuts

Add peanuts to the canister of a food processor, process on high power until creamy and smooth, about 5 minutes, stopping to scrape down the sides of the canister if necessary.

OPTIONS

If you’re unsure how a flavoring will turn out, I suggest removing half the peanut butter or two-thirds of it, placing it in another container, and flavor a smaller portion, to taste, before flavoring the entire batch with one particular seasoning or flavor. Or get two or three flavors from one recipe based on how inspired you are.

Crock Pot Apple Butter YUM

Crockpot Apple Butter

I got this post from http://changingmydestiny.wordpress.com/2011/10/08/crockpot-apple-butter/ its great, I use it every year (only I double the spices)!

…now on to the good stuff…

 

CrockPot Apple Butter

Crock Pot Apple Butter

Makes a little more than 1 pint

1 dozen apples, peeled, cored, cubed

1/2 Cup Water

1/4 Cup Brown Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon All Spice

Step 1:

Peel, Core, and Chop a dozen apples. I used apples from our trip to the Apple Orchard. I’m no apple expert, but these apples were more dense than the apples I typically buy in the grocery store. The flavor was great, but it took longer to break down in the Crockpot.

CrockPot Apple Butter

CrockPot Apple Butter

CrockPot Apple Butter

CrockPot Apple Butter

Step 2:

Toss the apples in the sugar and spices.

CrockPot Apple Butter

Step 3:

Put everything in the Crockpot, then [say it with me] Set It, and Forget It!

anyone else remember that infomercial?

I cooked it on Low overnight and woke up to this…

CrockPot Apple Butter

After a few more hours on low, I bumped it to high and propped the lid.

CrockPot Apple Butter

it cooked down and thickened quite a bit.

CrockPot Apple Butter

Step 4:

I suppose it’s optional, but I decided to blend the butter down smooth. You can eat it right out of the Crockpot, I did. I just took a spoon to the Crockpot and dove in, it was divine. However, for the finished product I wanted it smoother and pulled out my Magic Bullet since I don’t own an immersion blender. Then poured it into clean canning jars.

CrockPot Apple Butter

So after 15 hours and a dozen apples picked right from the tree, I had 1 pint of delicious apple butter. I froze half the batch and have the other half in the fridge just waiting to be eaten…maybe straight from the jar.

Oily roots, dry ends and how to meet in the middle

The biggest trouble with dry ends?  Is that they aren’t healthy happy ends, which means they aren’t pretty.  You know thats true.  Healthy hair is pretty hair.  But if you naturally have oily hair regardless of your dry ends I bet your roots can be oily.  That doesn’t mean you can avoid conditioning.  Here are some tricks to help your locks be more luscious!

1)     When shampooing your hair, focus on your roots (unless you’ve just finished a mudrun, in which case shampoo ALL of your gross muddy hair you rock star you).  Once you’ve scrubbed your roots, allow the water to rinse the shampoo over the rest of your hair.  It will rinse your hair clean without anything making a deep enough impact to make your ends unhappy.  Also make sure you are using the right shampoo, many shampoos can create their own build up instead of cleansing your locks)

2)     Condition your hair.  I know I know oily roots blah blah, you still have to condition.  First apply the conditioner to your ends, let it soak in while you lather up, shave whatever.  Then apply the conditioner to all of your hair, root to already saturated ends.  Let it sit for a moment before rinsing it all out.  Anytime you use a deep conditioner apply it only to your mid-shaft and ends.

3)     Apply a leave in conditioner or Dikson ArgaBeta Oil (part argon oil part keratin) to your mid-shaft and ends definitely not your roots and leave it on.
 
4)     Also the option of using a dry shampoo.  The ingredients in dry shampoo soak up oil and dirt on the scalp. When your hair appears greasy, usually just the roots that need to be refreshed. Applying a dry shampoo effectively soaks up any oil and dirt, leaving your hair looking refreshed and clean.  Buying you extra time between shampoos.
 
5)     Get regular trims.  Even if you’re trying to grow your hair out make sure to get your ends snipped to keep any dry split ends from getting worse.
 
I hope these hairapy tips help!  

45 ways to do midlength hair






 












9 hair tips and tricks you’ll be happy to know :)

1) Find a shampoo that lathers less.  Sudsy doesn’t necessarily mean clean—sometimes, it means the opposite. Shampoos that lather too much are often overloaded with moisturizing products, which can leave build-up in your hair, making it look and feel dirtier quicker. (Dikson shampoo being an Italian brand tends to lather less and still gets the job done!)

2) Give your locks a burst of cold. Before you hop out of the shower, turn the cold water on for a second and quickly rinse it through your strands. It helps seal the cuticle, adding a sleek finish to your locks.

3) Play hot-and-cold as you dry. When using a round brush to dry your hair in sections, start from the roots and dry all the way to the ends, letting the brush linger at the tips of your strands. Let your hair cool off like this on its own for five seconds, then repeat on another section. If your blow dryer has a cool setting you can also apply that for the same amount of time.  Alternating between heat and cool-down time helps set your style, and your blowout will have more body.

4) Use rollers for high-volume. For sex-kitten lift, blow out your locks until they’re dry. Then, section off the hair on top of your head—between your temples and all the way back to the crown of your hair. Divide that section into three smaller sections vertically (as if you were making an awesome mohawk), wrap each in a 2-inch velcro hair roller. Let your hair sit like this for 30 minutes, then unwrap your strands, lightly comb, and spray for hold.

5) Drop the towel. Keeping wet strands wrapped in a towel for a half-hour as you do your make-up will just cause frizz! The roughness of the cotton forces your hair cuticles open, making them more likely to go every-which-way. Instead, squeeze out excess water as soon as you’re out of the shower, then let your hair air-dry for five or ten minutes before blowdrying.

6) Apply products 10 minutes before you style. Whether you’re curling, straightening, or whatevering, applying product 10 minutes in advance helps it fully absorb into your strands so you get all of its benefits and more bang for your buck.

7) Wrap—don’t clamp—your hair for quick curls. When using a curling iron, you don’t need to fasten your locks to the barrel. Wrap sections around the iron and hold in place for about 10 seconds to score the same soft, sexy curls.

8) Use spray bottles as your new lazy-day BFF. If you wake up and your locks are totally flat or grungy from the day before, just spray the top layer of your hair until damp, and then use a big barrel roundbrush (2 inches or more) to blow your locks dry. You’ll score high volume on that top layer, and since it’s freshly blown out, you’ll create the illusion of all-over smooth hair.

9) Use dry shampoo a different way. Instead of waiting until your locks need an dirt-fighting pick-me-up, apply a dab of dry shampoo to your roots immediately after you wash and dry them. Though your hair’s already clean, the barrier will stave off the debris and oil your strands will collect throughout the day before it hits. Bonus: It also gives you killer volume.